MPC

MPC 2012, ISSUE 1



Mathematical Programming Computation, Volume 4, Issue 1, March 2012

Rounding-based heuristics for nonconvex MINLPs

Giacomo Nannicini, Pietro Belotti

We propose two primal heuristics for nonconvex mixed-integer nonlinear programs. Both are based on the idea of rounding the solution of a continuous nonlinear program subject to linear constraints. Each rounding step is accomplished through the solution of a mixed-integer linear program. Our heuristics use the same algorithmic scheme, but they differ in the choice of the point to be rounded (which is feasible for nonlinear constraints but possibly fractional) and in the linear constraints. We propose a feasibility heuristic, that aims at finding an initial feasible solution, and an improvement heuristic, whose purpose is to search for an improved solution within the neighborhood of a given point. The neighborhood is defined through local branching cuts or box constraints. Computational results show the effectiveness in practice of these simple ideas, implemented within an open-source solver for nonconvex mixedinteger nonlinear programs.

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Mathematical Programming Computation, Volume 4, Issue 1, March 2012

Globally solving nonconvex quadratic programming problems via completely positive programming

Jieqiu Chen, Samuel Burer

Nonconvex quadratic programming (QP) is an NP-hard problem that optimizes a general quadratic function over linear constraints. This paper introduces a new global optimization algorithm for this problem, which combines two ideas from the literature—finite branching based on the first-order KKT conditions and polyhedralsemidefinite relaxations of completely positive (or copositive) programs. Through a series of computational experiments comparing the new algorithm with existing codes on a diverse set of test instances, we demonstrate that the new algorithm is an attractive method for globally solving nonconvex QP.

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Mathematical Programming Computation, Volume 4, Issue 1, March 2012

Fast Fourier optimization

Robert J. Vanderbei

Many interesting and fundamentally practical optimization problems, ranging from optics, to signal processing, to radar and acoustics, involve constraints on the Fourier transform of a function. It is well-known that the fast Fourier transform (fft) is a recursive algorithm that can dramatically improve the efficiency for computing the discrete Fourier transform. However, because it is recursive, it is difficult to embed into a linear optimization problem. In this paper, we explain the main idea behind the fast Fourier transform and show how to adapt it in such a manner as to make it encodable as constraints in an optimization problem. We demonstrate a realworld problem from the field of high-contrast imaging. On this problem, dramatic improvements are translated to an ability to solve problems with a much finer grid of discretized points. As we shall show, in general, the “fast Fourier” version of the optimization constraints produces a larger but sparser constraint matrix and therefore one can think of the fast Fourier transform as a method of sparsifying the constraints in an optimization problem, which is usually a good thing.

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Mathematical Programming Computation, Volume 4, Issue 1, March 2012

A primal–dual regularized interior-point method for convex quadratic programs

M. P. Friedlander, D. Orban

Interior-point methods in augmented form for linear and convex quadratic programming require the solution of a sequence of symmetric indefinite linear systems which are used to derive search directions. Safeguards are typically required in order to handle free variables or rank-deficient Jacobians. We propose a consistent framework and accompanying theoretical justification for regularizing these linear systems. Our approach can be interpreted as a simultaneous proximal-point regularization of the primal and dual problems. The regularization is termed exact to emphasize that, although the problems are regularized, the algorithm recovers a solution of the original problem, for appropriate values of the regularization parameters.

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