MPC

MPC 2019, ISSUE 2



Mathematical Programming Computation, Volume 11, Issue 2, June 2019

The (not so) trivial lifting in two dimensions

Ricardo Fukasawa, Laurent Poirrier, Alinson S. Xavier

When generating cutting-planes for mixed-integer programs from multiple rows of the simplex tableau, the usual approach has been to relax the integrality of the non-basic variables, compute an intersection cut, then strengthen the cut coefficients corresponding to integral non-basic variables using the so-called trivial lifting procedure. Although of polynomial-time complexity in theory, this lifting procedure can be computationally costly in practice. For the case of two-row relaxations, we present a practical algorithm that computes trivial lifting coefficients in constant time, for arbitrary maximal lattice-free sets. Computational experiments confirm that the algorithm works well in practice.

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Mathematical Programming Computation, Volume 11, Issue 2, June 2019

QPLIB: a library of quadratic programming instances

Fabio Furini, Emiliano Traversi, Pietro Belotti, Antonio Frangioni, Ambros Gleixner, Nick Gould, Leo Liberti, Andrea Lodi, Ruth Misener, Hans Mittelmann, Nikolaos V. Sahinidis, Stefan Vigerske, Angelika Wiegele

This paper describes a new instance library for quadratic programming (QP), i.e., the family of continuous and (mixed)-integer optimization problems where the objective function and/or the constraints are quadratic. QP is a very diverse class of problems, comprising sub-classes ranging from trivial to undecidable. This diversity is reflected in the variety of QP solution methods, ranging from entirely combinatorial approaches to completely continuous algorithms, including many methods for which both aspects are fundamental. Selecting a set of instances of QP that is at the same time not overwhelmingly onerous but sufficiently challenging for the different, interested communities is therefore important. We propose a simple taxonomy for QP instances leading to a systematic problem selection mechanism. We then briefly survey the field of QP, giving an overview of theory, methods and solvers. Finally, we describe how the library was put together, and detail its final contents.

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Mathematical Programming Computation, Volume 11, Issue 2, June 2019

Solving linear programs with complementarity constraints using branch-and-cut

Bin Yu, John E. Mitchel, Jong-Shi Pang

A linear program with linear complementarity constraints (LPCC) requires the minimization of a linear objective over a set of linear constraints together with additional linear complementarity constraints. This class has emerged as a modeling paradigm for a broad collection of problems, including bilevel programs, Stackelberg games, inverse quadratic programs, and problems involving equilibrium constraints. The presence of the complementarity constraints results in a nonconvex optimization problem. We develop a branch-and-cut algorithm to find a global optimum for this class of optimization problems, where we branch directly on complementarities. We develop branching rules and feasibility recovery procedures and demonstrate their computational effectiveness in a comparison with CPLEX. The implementation builds on CPLEX through the use of callback routines. The computational results show that our approach is a strong alternative to constructing an integer programming formulation using big-M terms to represent bounds for variables, with testing conducted on general LPCCs as well as on instances generated from bilevel programs with convex quadratic lower level problems.

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Mathematical Programming Computation, Volume 11, Issue 2, June 2019

Simplex QP-based methods for minimizing a conic quadratic objective over polyhedra

Alper Atamtürk, Andres Gomez

We consider minimizing a conic quadratic objective over a polyhedron. Such problems arise in parametric value-at-risk minimization, portfolio optimization, and robust optimization with ellipsoidal objective uncertainty; and they can be solved by polynomial interior point algorithms for conic quadratic optimization. However, interior point algorithms are not well-suited for branch-and-bound algorithms for the discrete counterparts of these problems due to the lack of effective warm starts necessary for the efficient solution of convex relaxations repeatedly at the nodes of the search tree. In order to overcome this shortcoming, we reformulate the problem using the perspective of the quadratic function. The perspective reformulation lends itself to simple coordinate descent and bisection algorithms utilizing the simplex method for quadratic programming, which makes the solution methods amenable to warm starts and suitable for branch-and-bound algorithms. We test the simplex-based quadratic programming algorithms to solve convex as well as discrete instances and compare them with the state-of-the-art approaches. The computational experiments indicate that the proposed algorithms scale much better than interior point algorithms and return higher precision solutions. In our experiments, for large convex instances, they provide up to 22x speed-up. For smaller discrete instances, the speed-up is about 13x over a barrier-based branch-and-bound algorithm and 6x over the LP-based branch-and-bound algorithm with extended formulations. The software that was reviewed as part of this submission was given the Digital Object identifier https://doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.1489153.

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Mathematical Programming Computation, Volume 11, Issue 2, June 2019

Optimizing over pure stationary equilibria in consensus stopping games

Amin Dehghanian, Murat Kurt, Andrew J. Schaefer

Consensus decision-making, a widely utilized group decision-making process, requires the consent of all participants. We consider consensus stopping games, a class of stochastic games arising in the context of consensus decision-making that require the consent of all players to terminate the game. We show that a consensus stopping game may have many pure stationary equilibria, which in turn raises the question of equilibrium selection. Given an objective criterion, we study the NP-hard problem of finding a best pure stationary equilibrium. We characterize the pure stationary equilibria, show that they form an independence system, and develop several families of valid inequalities. We then solve the equilibrium selection problem as a mixed-integer linear program by a branch-and-cut approach. Our computational results demonstrate the effectiveness of our approach over a commercial solver.

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